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  • Lubavitcher Rebbe: The Messiah Won’t be a Hasid

    by Steven I. Weiss

    The Lubavitcher Rebbe said in a speech that the messiah won’t be a Hasid, but rather someone from the non-Hasidic Jewish population.

    This would, presumably, preclude the Rebbe himself, R’ Menachem Mendel Schneerson, from being the Messiah.

    Schneerson delivered the statement in this 1951 speech. The relevant portion comes at the section marked נג, in the fifth paragraph there. This was sent to me this week.

    Schneerson in this speech is speaking of the importance of “accepting the yoke” of service to God, and offers this tangential narrative about the first Lubavitcher Rebbe (the English translation is mine, and a bit loose in relaying the idioms):

    The first Lubavitcher Rebbe was brought to three “olamsher” (non-Hasidic) great rabbis, and when with one of them, that rabbi asked the first Lubavitcher Rebbe: “Who will be the messiah — a Hasid or a non-Hasidic Jew?” The first Lubavitcher Rebbe responded: “The messiah will be a non-Hasidic Jew.” The rabbi asked back, “Why?” and the first Lubavitcher Rebbe responded: “Because if the messiah were a Hasid, the non-Hasidic Jews wouldn’t want to follow him out of the diaspora; but if the messiah were a non-Hasidic Jew, he’d also attract the Hasidim.”

    These kinds of statements citing previous rebbes are generally seen as endorsing the concept implied. This would suggest that Schneerson agreed with this statement he’s quoting from the first Lubavitcher Rebbe.

    Here’s the passage in Hebrew:

    כ”ק מו”ח אדמו”ר סיפר שכאשר רבינו הזקן יצא מהמאסר, היתה סיבה שבגללה הגיע לביתו של יהודי שלא הי’ מחוג החסידים (“א עולם’שער איד”), ולאחרי אריכות הדברים הוכרח רבינו הזקן להבטיח לו שיבקר שלשה מהעולם’שע גדולים, וכשביקר אצל א’ מהם, שאל אותו גדול את רבינו הזקן: מי יהי’ משיח – חסיד או עולם’שער? והשיב רבינו הזקן: משיח יהי’ עולם’שער. ושאל: מדוע? והשיב רבינו הזקן, שאם משיח יהי’ חסיד, יתכן שהעולם’שע לא ירצו לצאת עמו מהגלות; אבל אם משיח יהי’ עולם’שער, יסכימו גם החסידים – להיותם קבלת-עול’ניקעס – לצאת עמו מהגלות מתוך קבלת-עול (“זאל זיין א עולם’שער, אבי ארויסגיין פון גלות”).

    June 11, 2010 | Read more Newsdesk posts. 2 Comments »

    Comments

    2 Comments »

    1. Interesting how you left out key passages from the translation, the first three lines.. (context).
      and the last line (qualifier).

      Even the part you translated is incorrect.
      First get it right, then lets discuss.

      Comment by Moshe — June 22, 2010 @ 1:11 pm

    2. Moshe – Please, if you think my translation isn’t sufficient, feel free to supply your own and explain how you feel that alters the substance of the message.

      Comment by Steven I. Weiss — June 22, 2010 @ 1:13 pm

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