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  • Orthodox Rabbinical Group Outlines Women’s Roles as “Clergy” and More

    by Steven I. Weiss

    In a noticeable contrast to the resolution of the mainstream Orthodox Rabbinical Council of America’s resolution forbidding Orthodox women rabbis, this resolution from the International Rabbinic Fellowship — a more-liberal group about 1/3 the size of the RCA — does just about everything but use the word “rabbi” to describe women’s roles in Orthodox life, calling for them to be “clergy,” “spiritual guides and mentors,” “preachers,” “teachers of Torah” and “persons who can… answer questions…in all areas of Jewish law in which they are well-versed.”

    In other words, they’re saying women can be like Maharat Sara Hurwitz, if not explicitly Rabba Sara Hurwitz.

    Interesting to note that they’ve stopped short of including women as rabbis in their organization — at least thus far — though IRF co-founder R’ Marc Angel called it “quite likely” in an e-mail to TJC in March. So was that option jettisoned, or simply delayed?

    Full text of the resolution is after the jump.

    The International Rabbinic Fellowship is thankful and grateful to the Almighty and to a cadre of visionary educators, rabbis and communal leaders of the Modern Orthodox community for the amazing growth of Torah learning for women, in all its forms, which has transformed the face of the Orthodox community for the better in the last fifty years.

    We strongly support the work and efforts of the myriad of Torah learning programs and institutions for women, both long-established and new, both in the Diaspora and in Israel. We hope that these institutions continue to grow and that even more opportunities for talented women who would like to continue on to the next level of Torah scholarship, involving multi-year opportunities for serious Torah learning, will emerge in the years to come.

    We express our support for the sincere desire of the graduates of these learning programs to contribute their spiritual talents to the Jewish people as teachers, spiritual guides and mentors. We also affirm the dedication and sacrifice of so many women in our community, and their desire to serve their congregations and their people in formal leadership capacities, while affirming the specific areas that Halakha delimits.

    We strongly encourage communities and their rabbinic leaders to create opportunities to discuss this important phenomenon in an open and reflective manner, in order to enable continuing progress in a spirit of shalom and communal harmony.

    In an effort to outline some practical guidelines that we believe our communities should consider – recognizing that each community and its rabbinic leadership retain the authority to determine what is appropriate for their communal context – we affirm that:

    Observant and committed Orthodox women who are learned, trained and competent should have every opportunity to fully serve the Jewish community:

    1. As teachers of Torah, in all its breadth and depth – Shebikhtav, Shebe‘al Peh and Practical Halakha – to both men and women.

    2. As persons who can answer questions and provide guidance to both men and women in all areas of Jewish law in which they are well-versed.

    3. As clergy who function as pastoral counselors – visiting the sick, helping couples work through relationship difficulties, taking care of the arrangements for burial, speaking at life-cycle events and giving counsel to individuals and families in distress.

    4. As spiritual preachers and guides who teach classes and deliver divrei Torah and derashot, in the synagogue and out, both during the week and on Shabbatot and holidays.

    5. As spiritual guides and mentors, helping arrange and managing life-cycle events such as weddings, bar- and bat-mitzvah celebrations and funerals, while refraining from engaging in those aspects of these events that Halakha does not allow for women to take part in.

    6. As presidents and full members of the boards of synagogues and other Torah institutions.

    July 6, 2010 | Read more Newsdesk posts. 3 Comments »

    Comments

    3 Comments »

    1. R. Angel never said women would be included *as rabbis* in the organization. R. Angel said women would be included in some capacity – but clearly not as rabbis.

      Comment by Jon — July 7, 2010 @ 6:04 am

    2. Jon – I’m not sure I buy that distinction, but either way — the expectation expressed by Angel was that it was “quite likely that women will then be eligible for membership.” Thus far, we’re not seeing that.

      Comment by Steven I. Weiss — July 7, 2010 @ 6:13 am

    3. [...] protests in front of White House over Israeli digging of graves ▪ New Young Israel advocacy ▪ Orthodox Rabbinical Group Outlines Women’s Roles as “Clergy” and More ▪ R. Jeffrey Saks’ review in Tradition of biography of R. Ovadiah Yosef (PDF) ▪ Jewish [...]

      Pingback by News & Links | Hirhurim – Musings — July 7, 2010 @ 12:42 pm

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